Fort Stanton-Snowy River Cave National Conservation Area, New Mexico Recreation Area Info & Images

Fort Stanton-Snowy River Cave National Conservation Area Image Gallery

Directions

From the intersection of NM 246 and US 380 in Capitan, NM, drive east on US 380 for 4.3 miles to NM 220, which will be on the right. From the west end of Lincoln, NM, drive west 7.75 miles to NM 220, which will be on the left. Drive south 0.9 for miles to the Rob Jaggers Campground, where maps and an information kiosk are available. Historic Fort Stanton is approximately 1.5 miles further south on NM 220. On the grounds of Fort Stanton, the State of New Mexico operates a museum with information about the Fort and the Fort Stanton – Snowy River Cave NCA.

Phone

575-354-0099

Activities

BIKING, CAMPING, HIKING, HORSEBACK RIDING, HUNTING, RECREATIONAL VEHICLES, WILDLIFE VIEWING

Campground Reservations

New Mexico Campgrounds

Hiking Trails

New Mexico Hiking Trails

Related Link(s)

More New Mexico Recreation Areas | BLM New Mexico Flickr | BLM New Mexico Flickr | BLM New Mexico YouTube Channel | BLM New Mexico Facebook Page | BLM New Mexico Twitter | BLM New Mexico Facebook Page | BLM New Mexico YouTube Channel | BLM New Mexico Twitter

The Fort Stanton – Snowy River Cave National Conservation Area (NCA) was established in 2009 to protect, conserve, and enhance the unique and nationally important historic, cultural, scientific, archaeological, natural, and educational subterranean cave resources of the Fort Stanton – Snowy River Cave system. The NCA was once known as the Fort Stanton Military Reservation. In 1855, the U.S. Army established Fort Stanton as an Infantry and Cavalry post in the east-central New Mexico Territory to protect settlers in the region. Within the NCA is Fort Stanton Cave, at over 31 miles, it is the second longest cave in New Mexico, the 14th longest cave in the U.S., the 62th longest in the world, and the largest cave managed by the BLM. Snowy River is a significant passage within Fort Stanton Cave, and is the longest cave formation in the world. Today, approximately 15 miles of previously unknown passage have been mapped, without reaching the end.